St. Louis Census By Neighborhood: Downtown Biggest Winner; North City Biggest Loser

well goodfellow home.jpg
A vacant home in the Wells Goodfellow neighborhood for sale through the city's Land Reutilization Authority.
More 2010 Census date is out following the devastating (perhaps surprising) news yesterday that St. Louis lost 29,000 residents over the past decade.

Today the website of St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay has an interesting spreadsheet documenting how each city neighborhood fared over the past decade. The data shows that downtown was the biggest winner in terms of population -- growing 359 percent from 806 residents in 2000 to over 3,700 last year.

Neighborhood in north St. Louis were hit the hardest. The Academy Neighborhood between Delmar and Martin Luther King Dr. lost 26 percent of its population. College Hill near I-70 and West Florissant saw a 37 percent drop in residents; Greater Ville lost 2,000 people, Hyde Park's population went down 29 percent. The Ville and Wells Goodfellow neighborhoods saw a 31 percent and 28 percent decline, respectively.

Much of those north city neighborhoods also experienced double digit percentage drops between 1990 and 2000, producing what's been termed a "hollowing out" of the city's core. McRee Town in south-central St. Louis also saw a 43 percent decrease in population, but that can be contributed to much of the neighborhood being blighted during the 2000s and replaced with singe-family homes.

Curiously some of the biggest decreases and increases by percentage occurred in areas of the city where you'd think no one lives. Forest Park (the actual park and not the surrounding neighborhoods) had 4 residents in 2000 and none in 2010 for a decline of 100 percent. Meanwhile, Tower Grove Park had four residents in 2000 and eight in 2010 for a 100 percent increase.

See how your neighborhood fared here.

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6 comments
Guest
Guest

Is there an official definition of each neighborhood? i.e., What are the north, south, east and west borders of each neighborhood?

Ken
Ken

Was this blog written by a 5 year old? Forget the typos, the last paragraph is so unimportant it makes me question the validity of the entire 'article'.

WestEnd
WestEnd

I wonder what the breakdown was by neighborhood in 1950 when we had 850,000 residents. Its hard to imagine that many people living in these neighborhoods alone. Have municipalities separated themselves from the city of St. Louis since the 50s? or has the city always had only these neighborhoods?

Kassavich
Kassavich

Is the loop listed in there? Did it grow? Would the census numbers affect the price of real estate? I was thinking of buying an apartment and was wondering if the knowledge that stl pop declined so much would allow me to negotiate a lower price despite if a certain neighborhood is doing well

eric
eric

is there any info available for changes in average size of household and average household income? it seems that the poorest neighborhoods have declined the most

useful post for a change
useful post for a change

The city portion of the loop (east loop) is torn between the West End and the Skinker/Debaliviere neighborhoods. The Loop proper is in University City, which is St. Louis County. It would be hard to get a hard number associated with "The Loop" since it is broken down between 2 counties and at least 3 different neighborhoods.

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