Church of Scientology Announces L. Ron Hubbard Centennial Three Days Late

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Happy 100th birthday, L. Ron!
​OK, it's true, the dateline on the press release the Church of Scientology sent us about the centennial of its founder L. Ron Hubbard was March 13. But it didn't land in Unreal's e-mail in-box until March 16. (Yes, we know, it's March 18 now, but we're still not as far behind as the Scientologists. So there!)

Apparently, for the creators of this press release, Hubbard's "genius" is proportional to the number of words he cranked out during his lifetime: "35 million words, 12,000 writings and 3,000 recorded lectures."

If Unreal generates that much crap, do you think we could get our own cult, er, religion too?

Centennial Celebrations Announced for One of the Most Remarkable Americans of the 20th Century

March 13th 2011 marks the Centennial Celebration of author, humanitarian and philosopher L. Ron Hubbard (www.lronhubbard.org) and is being celebrated throughout the world.

March 13, 2011 St. Louis, MO -- Across major cities in the United States, the Americas, Africa, Australia, Asia and Europe millions will recognize the life works and legacy of L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) on his Centennial Celebration this coming March 13th 2011. Celebrations will take place through next Saturday, the 19th of March, in commemoration of Mr. Hubbard's many contributions in the areas of the arts, exploration, his fiction works, his work as a humanitarian and the religious philosophy Mr. Hubbard developed, all of which are known and used by millions worldwide.

Born in Tilden, Nebraska on March 13th 1911, the son of a Naval Officer*, L. Ron Hubbard's adventures and travels began at an early age by becoming the nation's youngest Eagle Scout of his day in 1924 - just two weeks after his thirteenth birthday. By the age of 19 he had traveled over 250,000 miles before the advent of air travel** by way of land and sea throughout America, the Caribbean and the Far East. These travels brought Mr. Hubbard face to face with many different cultures where he witnessed widespread social degradation in many different lands. This provided him a first hand insight into society's most prevalent issues and served as a research base to his philosophical and humanitarian works in use today.

L. Ron Hubbard is known as one of the most prolific writers of the 20th Century - publishing 138 short stories, novelettes and novels during the 1930's and 1940's. This early writing career funded his continued research into the mind and the nature of man, only interrupted by his military service during WWII where he saw action both in the Atlantic and the Pacific. In 1948 Mr. Hubbard served as a Special Officer of the LAPD, which he used like any other experience in life - to observe in order to resolve problems concerned with social degradation.

His research led to the release of Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health and several years later was the founding of the Scientology Religion. Continuously researching in order to help his fellow man, L. Ron Hubbard later developed humanitarian programs for drug rehabilitation & detoxification, criminal reform, education & literacy and his common sense guide to better living - The Way to Happiness - which combined have touched close to a billion lives in over 170 nations.

Mr. Hubbard's total body of literary accomplishments, fiction and non-fiction, expanded to become the largest single works for any individual - 35 million words, 12,000 writings and 3,000 recorded lectures.

"We are celebrating the centennial of one of the most remarkable lives of the 20th Century," said President of the Friends of L. Ron Hubbard Foundation, Monica Sanz Polo. "Mr. Hubbard has left an indelible mark as an author, humanitarian and philosopher whose life works and legacy are known and cherished throughout the world."

In anticipation of the L. Ron Hubbard Centennial, hundreds of letters of recognition, proclamations, awards and honors have been received by the Friends of L. Ron Hubbard Foundation from around the world in recognition of Mr. Hubbard's works.

For more information on the life and works of L. Ron Hubbard visit the new interactive audio visual website www.lronhubbard.org.

* Does anyone else find it fishy that a Naval Officer would be living in Nebraska?

** Hubbard turned nineteen in 1930. The Wright Brothers first flew in 1903. Airplanes were used in World War I (1914-1918). Charles Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic by plane in 1927. Even if Hubbard weren't that special -- and who are we to deny that he was? -- he could have taken a commercial flight as far back as 1914.

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Computer_Ghost
Computer_Ghost

How to win an argument: It's simple, you learned how to do it in kindergarten. What you do is point at your adversary and say "He's crazy." It works wonders because it doesn't engage logic at all and simply vilifies your opponent, especially when no one in this society really knows what craziness is, especially the so called "authorities" on craziness, psychologists and psychiatrists. They just take a vote on whether you are crazy, very scientific stuff <note sarcasm="" the="" there="">.</note>

Guest
Guest

Yeah, believing that human thought is influenced by the souls of dead space aliens instead of believing that it's a function of chemical reactions really "engages my logic" /sarcasm. Craziness is buying L Ron's lies about his accomplishments, or it's a sore lack of critical thought. Let's vote on that. Ittakes a lot of nerve for a Scientology like you to rip on psychology for being non-scientific when anecdotal "success stories" that sound like marketing spam are all you have to fall back on.

Mike
Mike

LRH was a conman. He was a liar (proven). He was a fraud (proven) and he was a multiple, convicted criminal (proven). His last conviction for fraud relating directly to Scientology practice was in 1978 and he was sentenced to three years in jail. He lied about his military career (proven) and he lies about his academic career (proven). He was never a nuclear physicist as he and the criminally convicted cult of Scientology like to rattle on about (proven) and even though LRH and the criminally convicted cult of Scientology rage against drugs, LRH himself took many different types of mind altering drugs during his lifetime, and indeed, when he kicked the bucket, he was found with quantities if Vistaril in his blood. He was a bully, and a complete and utter mental case by the time he died in a decrepit, unkempt state in a motor home, hiding away from teh law in 1986. He was banned and barred from entering numerous countries by then, including my on country, and the site of his beloved Saint Hill, the UK.

Guest
Guest

Louanne and Jeff Smado are the same person, Louanne posts under 20 different nicknames

Louanne
Louanne

Over 9000, dude, at least!

Guest
Guest

Louanne and Jeff Smado posted within minutes of each other, that's not suspicious at all, or at least not to those stupid wogs that lack Scientology super-powers.

Brussell1000
Brussell1000

Louanne Lee is a Scientology OSA agent. You'll see her name all over the internet commenting on articles and trying to make Scientology seem a little less creepy. Doesn't seem to be working though.

Brussell1000
Brussell1000

The New Yorker article about Paul Haggis' escape from Scientology does a good job of debunking the Hubbard as war hero myth. Hubbard was a liar and a fraud, and he created Scientology in that same image.

"Scientology is evil; its techniques are evil; its practice is a serious threat to the community, medically, morally, and socially; and its adherents are sadly deluded and often mentally ill... (Scientology is) the world's largest organization of unqualified persons engaged in the practice of dangerous techniques which masquerade as mental therapy." - Justice Anderson, Supreme Court of Victoria, Australia

Jeff Smado
Jeff Smado

Oh, and may I break the news to you that US Navy personal is drawn from all areas of the United States?

anonymous
anonymous

the word you're looking for is "personnel", and your comment is asinine.

the question isn't whether a naval officer would be born in nebraska, but rather would he be stationed there. sit down and shut the fuck up you cult member shithead.

Jeff Smado
Jeff Smado

The point about L. Ron Hubbard being an aviator is that he knew exactly what he was writing about as a the author of adventure stories later on. It would be helpful for you to do your homework, for example here: http://www.lronhubbard.org/bio...

“Adventure is my guidon,” declared L. Ron Hubbard, and promptly proceeded to etch that statement across not only land and sea, but also across the skies.It all began in the spring of 1931—not long after his return from the Pacific—when a twenty-year-old Ron Hubbard called a first fateful meeting of the George Washington University Glider Club. Initially, less than a dozen hearty souls replied.

The craft was the Franklin utility glider, and facilities were primitive: a ramshackle tower above patches of knee-high grass and ankle-deep mud, with a corrugated shed for the hangar. Nevertheless, the George Washington University Buzzards were born, and Ron Hubbard had now taken to the skies, to eventually earn the 385th American glider license.

For Mr. Hubbard and his fellow pilots, it was flying as Man intended to fly, “precariously, and by the seat of your pants,” as wits of the day remarked. Instrumentation was crude—an altimeter at best—while crafts were either towed from a bumper or flung from cliffs by means of shock cords. And make no mistake, it was dangerous. As of 1931, some three hundred souls had fallen to their deaths in powerless aircraft. Then too, bear in mind these were still largely experimental days: Lindbergh had only crossed the Atlantic four years earlier.

The experimental Ryan ST, photographed by L. Ron Hubbard for the Sportsman Pilot.While in addition to glider flights, L. Ron Hubbard could also be spotted barnstorming across the US in a sixty-horsepower Arrow Sport biplane—“with the wind as our only compass.”As for the contemporary impression of his aviation adventures, a 1934 article from The Pilot entitled “‘Flash’ Hubbard” perhaps states it best:

“Whenever two or three pilots are gathered together around the nation’s capital, whether it be a congressional hearing or just in the back of some hangar, you’ll probably hear the name of Ron Hubbard mentioned, accompanied by such adjectives as ‘crazy,’ ‘wild’ and ‘dizzy.’ For the flaming-haired pilot hit the city like a tornado a few years ago and made women scream and strong men weep by his aerial antics. He just dared the ground to come up and hit him....

“At present, our young hero is buzzing around on the West Coast, where he writes magazine stories between flights. He is now recognized as one of the outstanding glider pilots in the country.”

Louanne
Louanne

If you actually read the news article you see that the international celebrations are on the weekend after the birthday, on the 19th March 2011, all over the world, which is - I firmly believe - tomorrow. Oops, there goes your crappy headline....

Torch Swiffy
Torch Swiffy

Slow news day huh? This news article is so flimsy and unsubstantial that I have to laugh. I don't see anything unusual with a religion celebrating the birthday of its revered leader in a week-long series of events. Even Christians' Christmas season ends in early January and not on the eve of December 26. And the release IS dated March 13, so what's the issue here?

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