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Richard Bradley: St. Charles Man Labeled Sexually Violent Predator; Detained Indefinitely

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Richard Bradley, 42, became the 12th Missouri prisoner this year committed to the state's Sex Offender Rehabilitation and Treatment Service in Farmington where he could stay the rest of his life.

Bradley will join 174 other sex offenders who've completed their sentences for their crimes but been found by juries upon their release from prison to be too risky to return to the general public. In Bradley's case, he was arrested in 1992 in St. Charles County for the deviate sexual abuse of two neighbor girls, ages 6 and 7. He pleaded guilty, was placed on probation, and ordered into sex offender treatment. While Bradley was on probation, authorities discovered that he had been abusing children before his 1992 arrest. Bradley was later arrested in 1994 for the forcible sodomy and rape of a female child while she was 4 and 5. In 1995, Bradley pleaded guilty to sodomy in St. Charles County and was sentenced to serve 16 years in prison. He was scheduled for release this year.

"It is critical that we keep those who could commit further violent sexual acts off the streets and away from those they could harm," Attorney General Chris Koster said Friday. "It is important for individuals who are deemed sexually violent predators to get the help they need while the community is protected."

By law, Bradley will have the right to have his case reviewed annually to determine if he's reformed enough to re-enter society. But the chance of that happening is practically nil. As the state told Daily RFT last summer, no one who's been committed to the Farmington facility has ever been released.

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3 comments
Vicki Henry
Vicki Henry

If you readarticles from as far back as 2009 you will see how the SORTS program works...ordoesn't! Basically, these 170+ folks are convicted, serve their sentences ofMANY years and then go through a hearing to be civilly committed and if thatjury does not commit them they are held till the next trial and so on until ajury does commit. While in prison they are required to take the Sex OffenderTreatment Program and then again when committed. Now here is the point of thispost. There are over 780,000 registered men, women and children on registriesacross the nation for crimes ranging from ridiculous to the most egregious. Ofthat number 15,000 are from Missouri with 3,000 of those currentlyincarcerated. Really! The cost of incarceration is approximately $29,000 perperson per year. The cost of implementation and maintenance of the registry ismillions (Justice Policy Institute) and the civil commitment maintenance is $9,000 a month (per astatement issued). Are you getting the picture? The civilly committed are NEVERgiven a step-by-step program to be downgraded or released. Then if you add thecollateral damage to a family of 3 or 4, nationally that is over 2,000,000 andin Missouri over 36,000 wives, mothers, children, grandmothers and other lovedones affected by a registry which is further punishment after the convictionand resulting punishment. You can research the issue if you wish.

WomenAgainst Registry dot com

Neiljones111
Neiljones111

I mean, I'm sure I'm not the first person to raise this issue, and by no means am I defending sexual deviants, but... How is this the least bit constitutional?

Douche_McGee
Douche_McGee

it's a shame other repeat offenders can't be held for the same reason

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