Area Wolves Seek Transportation for the Holidays

Categories: News

resizewolves.jpg
www.endangeredwolfcenter.org
​This holiday season while families gather and write down their Christmas lists, Rachel Broom, director of development at the Endangered Wolf Center (6750, Tyson Valley Rd, Eureka) will continue her search for transportation for the 42 wolves, wild dogs, and foxes that call the center home.

Located on 63 acres in west St. Louis County, the center's Wheels for Wolves campaign seeks monetary donations to raise money for vehicles to transport the animals to the Saint Louis Zoo for medical treatment and check ups. The center is also accepting donated vans, trucks, and golf carts for use on the center's property.

The roots of the Endangered Wolf Center date back four decades when Marlin Perkins, a former director of the Saint Louis Zoo and host of the Emmy-nominated television show Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom, founded the organization with his wife, Carol.


"Through travel and retirement, the Perkins realized that if they did not do something to protect the Red wolf or Mexican gray wolf then they would become extinct. That is why they joined with other scientists and friends and formed the center in 1971," Broom says.

The center, which has ties to the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, is able to stay afloat financially through corporate funding, foundation grants, and a gift shop. It also depends heavily on the generosity of its committed members.

"We have wonderful collaborators and volunteers," says Broom. "Washington University helps provide the perfect environment for our animals to breed properly. The Saint Louis Zoo provides vet care service and Mazuri Exotic Canine Diet provides a lot of the chow for the animals."

The center is different from a zoo, in that its goal is to breed animals for the purpose of reintroducing them into the wild.

"If they weren't here, they would be gone off the planet," says Broom of the center's Mexican gray wolves, Red wolves, Maned wolves, Swift foxes and African wild dogs. "We are their alternative to extinction."

Since the release of its first Mexican gray wolf in 1998, the center has reintroduced 100 of the species back into the wild along the New Mexico and Arizona border. Recognized as the most endangered mammal in North America, only fifty Mexican gray wolves exist within the wild.

The Red wolf, the second most-endangered wolf in the wild, is reintroduced in North Carolina, while the Swift fox is re-introduced in south-central Canada. The center is currently working on a release program for African Wild Dogs and Maned Wolves.

Regina Mossotti, director of animal care and conservation at the wolf center, says wolves benefit the plant life of their surroundings, as wolves prey on elk and other large mammals that can over consume the flora of their environments.

"The No. 1 reason these animals are in jeopardy is human a result of human action; therefore we have to take responsibility to help them make a comeback," says Broom.

You can help Broom achieve that goal this holiday season by gift of cash, time, or a donated vehicle. The Endangered Wolf Center seeks volunteers from all professional backgrounds, ranging from maintenance to marketing. The list is endless, says Broom.


Advertisement

My Voice Nation Help
9 comments
SeaWolf
SeaWolf

Sad that there are those that choose to be wannabe proofreaders instead of focusing on the article. I support a different wolf sanctuary that has 40 wolves alone in addition to other canine species. In their case, they pay a vet from the local zoo to make a visit to the park. This is much less stressful for the animals, faster and certainly more cost efficient. The vet does everything from simple checkups to surgery right there. The center should really look into this option. If the zoo vet is willing/able to look at the center's wolves there, then he should also be able to travel to the center to look at them there.

Webb17
Webb17

Education is one of the biggest parts of the EWC's mission--kudos to the RFT for providing such wonderful internship opportunities to educate the next generation, and for choosing to write about the important work being done by the Endangered Wolf Center.

Ralph Pfremmer
Ralph Pfremmer

Chad, please thank your intern for taking an interest.  I spelled Mexican Gray Wolf,  "Grey", multiple times, in a letter that was to be in the EWC's Newsletter a while back, as the Board President. Just another lesson on these animals and the continued need to educate.  We will certainly take any and all communication.  Thanks Ashley!--Ralph Pfremmer  

Jonathon
Jonathon

It's nice that the Riverfront Times is taking an active interest in one of the many great non-profit organizations in the St. Louis area during the holiday season (a time when most people are trying to find ways to donate their time, money, or in this case vehicles to worthy causes). I hope it just inspires more people to go out to the EWC to see the animals and give what they can to help save these endangered animals!

Robertsmith
Robertsmith

I am sadden by the unprofessional writing too.  It does not do the Endangered Wolf Center justice.  What a wonderful organization--how many organizations can say that they saved two species from extinction.  I hope St. Louisan's are proud of this accomplishment in their own backyard...literally...stones throw from St.Louis.  Go visit them and see their great work first-hand.

Sarah1
Sarah1

Wow, this is the most poorly written article I have ever read.  Poor spelling, grammar, and the reporter obviously did not check his facts.  Riverfront Times is a St. Louis News Paper and they couldn't even spell Marlin Perkin's name correctly....really...wow.

L Largo
L Largo

Marlin Perkins name is spelled as printed in the article.

Chad Garrison
Chad Garrison

This article was written by a student interning with Riverfront Times this semester. As the author's editor, I apologize that we got the spelling of Marlin wrong. I'll take the blame for that. That said, no other spelling or grammar errors are jumping out at me. I'm sorry you disliked the article. FWIW, this story came about after one of the board members with the wolf center mentioned the "Wolves for Wheels" campaign to me and asked if RFT might consider writing about it. I told that person that it wasn't exactly a news story, but perhaps we could write something for our blog mentioning the campaign and informing readers about the wolf center and its mission. I don't see how this article is so horrible that it detracts from the integrity of the wolf center. But if other supporters of the organization feel it's so bad, we can always delete the post.

L Largo
L Largo

I give kudos to the RFT for their generous effort to promote the centers need for vehicles and hate to see the ‘Spirit of Good’ dampened by a typo (I’ve seen worse in the Wall Street Journal).  I agree with Robert Smith that it’s a mission that deserves supporting and would personally like to see the focus of the article remain on what’s important; the endangered species that depend on us all for survival

Now Trending

St. Louis Concert Tickets

Around The Web

From the Vault

 

General

Loading...