Bart Korman Pushes Cycling Ban Bill, Says Residents Are Fed Up With Bikes On Highways

bike ban image.jpeg
via mobikefed.org
Last month, cycling advocates across Missouri began spreading the word about a possible "bicycle ban" bill that Republican lawmakers would be promoting this legislative session -- in hopes of squashing it before it was even introduced.

Despite the preemptive push-back, Representative Bart Korman, of High Hill, introduced the legislation last week, which would prohibit cyclists from riding on certain state roads.

"I do not want to ban little Johnny from riding his bike to school," Korman tells Daily RFT, arguing that some of the backlash is misunderstood. "I want to avoid someone getting hit or killed."

How would his bill impact cyclists?

House Bill 672, officially introduced last week -- though advocates leaked a version a week earlier -- would change the law to prohibit "bicycle operation on state roadways when there is a state bicycle path or trail running generally parallel and within two miles of a roadway, with an exception for certain bicycle travel."

That "exception" part is key, Korman says. The language of the bill, full version on view below, says the ban would apply to those state roads near parallel bike paths or trails:

except a bicycle may operate on the shoulder of a state roadway when the bicycle is operated as a means to ride to or from the operator's home to another residence, to a place of business, to a school, or to any public facility.

In other words, if the cyclist needs to be on that state road to get to a specific place on that road, then it wouldn't be a violation.

Rep. Bart Korman 1.jpeg
via Facebook
Representative Bart Korman

"The purpose of the bill is to encourage people to use the bicycle trails that are for the bicycles and pedestrians and not for motor vehicles," he explains, "to relieve some congestion."

Continue for more of our interview with Bart Korman and response from bike advocates.


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26 comments
claybowler
claybowler

By the way Representative. Korman, what's next? No walking along a Missouri road? No skating? No skateboards on Missouri roads? No segways? No 49cc scooters? Where does it stop? 

I will not comply with your law if passed Mr. Korman just like I didn't in Lake Forest.

claybowler
claybowler

Benjamin Franklin once said those who give up liberty for safety deserve neither. Here we have a Republican, you know the party of liberty who has aligned itself with the Tea Party, pushing the nanny state and big government in the name of safety and his inconvenience for his agenda. I don't know Korman's voting record, but I am willing to bet he has appropriated money for Missouri highways, which means he has confiscated money from both cyclists and non cyclists who use these roads. Now he wants to force one group of taxpayers off the roads but no doubt demand they continue to pay their fair share. 

As a former USCF licensed cyclist, I have seen how these laws remove cyclists from the roads and force them onto bike paths like in Lake Forest, Illinois. While Korman says he is for safety, he doesn't have the wisdom to see how this is going to endanger children swerving into the other lane of the bike path in a blind corner into the path of one of these faster cyclists. He probably has no experience of Johnny iPod looking for a song with the volume turned up not hearing a cyclist call on your left as he walks in front of the cyclist. These are things I have experienced as I was forced to a bike path for my training rides. You are more likely to produce injuries by forcing these riders onto bike paths than you would had you simply not tried to regulate every freedom we have including the freedom to ride your bike on a Missouri roadway. 

Kevin Noonan
Kevin Noonan

Ban them from all roads. Cant stand these pretentious spandex wearing assholes. They act like they own the road. If you want to use the roads do the speed limit. That means 40 in a 40 zone. Use turn signals. Stop at stop signs. Don't exceed the speed limit when going down hills. Don't make cars slow down to avoid you and other cars. Either construct lanes for bikes or lets run them off.

Nathan Berkley
Nathan Berkley

It may be "fair" in some respects but it is also unwarranted and a misdirection of time that could be better spent considering infrastructure or anything else. Bicyclists deserve a space on the road.

Kelly Kaufmann
Kelly Kaufmann

Once I read the article, the proposed rule sounds reasonable. It will prohibit "bicycle operation on state roadways when there is a state bicycle path or trail running generally parallel and within two miles of a roadway, with an exception for certain bicycle travel." The exception is wide open: "except a bicycle may operate on the shoulder of a state roadway when the bicycle is operated as a means to ride to or from the operator's home to another residence, to a place of business, to a school, or to any public facility." This all seems pretty fair.

Adam Hardebeck
Adam Hardebeck

It does make sense that one of the fattest States in the U.S would be anti-bike though

Jennifer O'Neal
Jennifer O'Neal

It's ass backwards. People in cars need to.pay better attention to actually driving. Cyclists need to be aware of cars. How does a ban solve anything? this is why Missouri will remain of the fatter states. Where are the bills to encourage health

Steve Mincer
Steve Mincer

it's backwards until one of these idiots comes into your lane and you hit them, and you get sued.

Peggy Keller
Peggy Keller

This is so backwards. Most states are moving to add bike lanes and protect cyclists because it adds value to communities. This is just stupid.

Andy Crossett
Andy Crossett

I think the we should ask the idiots who want this to secede from the state. And we will stay away.

JamesMadison
JamesMadison topcommenter

A solution in search of a problem.


Drivers need to respect the bicyclists' right to share the road. Bicyclists need to obey the road laws as well. I've rode thousands of miles on state highways, and never had a problem. Driving I know to slow down and make a safe passing of the cyclists. If an Amish horse and buggy is allowed, so are bicyclists.

There cannot be laws from some, and other laws for others. Whether I live on the road or not does not matter. I have a right to free travel.

Sounds like it is time for a Naked Bike Ride to protest this Bill!

BIKESBIKESBIKES
BIKESBIKESBIKES

What exactly counts as a "state roadway"?  Isn't Chouteau/Manchester technically Missouri State Highway 100, and isn't Chouteau/Manchester a designated bike route with a shared lane & tons of "share the road"/"bikes may use full lane" signs?  If Korman's hill town can't handle bikes, fine, pass a lazy local law that accomodates the whopping 200 people living there.  This is too broad & vague of a proposal to affect the whole state.

OFlent1970
OFlent1970

@claybowler Ban farmers, construction vehicles, transport trucks.. just ban all road users that aren't personal passenger vehicles. Also give tax rebates to people who are driving single occupant SUVs to wal mart. They are the real heros to our economy!

I guess the idea was to make missouri the worst state? Yes, I agree, implement our ideas pus the bike ban and it will become (more of) a shitty place to live!

OFlent1970
OFlent1970

@Kevin Noonan So... same rules for you then....
drive 40 in a 40. Use turn signals. Stop at stop signs. Don't exceed the speed limit when going down hills. Don't make cars doing the speed limit change lanes to avoid you, don't make bikes not exceeding the speed limit change lanes to avoid you.

claybowler
claybowler

@Kevin Noonan@Kevin Noonan  You act as if you own the road. Perhaps, we can talk Representative Korman in introducing a bill to name a highway after you. There are plenty of cyclist who do respect the rules of the road. For you to lump everyone into the same category shows how week your argument really is. These people pay the same road taxes you do. Some of the probably even pay more than you do. This is an example of a Republican pushing the nanny state.

codycraven18
codycraven18

@Kevin Noonan, you are a moron. What bicyclist do you know goes over 40 mph on a road anyways? And not all bikers are, as you say,  "pretentious spandex wearing assholes" you stereotypical fool. Keep driving your overpriced gas guzzling smog machine while us fit, intelligent, green bikers save money and keep our planet's air and road ways clean. 

OFlent1970
OFlent1970

@Nathan Berkley I don't think it's fair in any sense of the word..

mcaruso03
mcaruso03

@Kelly Kaufmann To a person that is not experienced with riding with traffic the proposal might seem fair and even beneficial to cyclists. Perhaps the congressman really does have good intentions. Of course the old adage the road to hell is paved with good intentions couldn't be more right here. As Claybowler already mentioned. There are landmines on bike path. Not literal landmines but small children. They don't hold lines they ride all over the place. There is no left on your left when dealing with a small child ahead of you. Its wait to they are as far right as possible then quickly pass them yelling on your left and thank you. Doing it any other time they are likely to dart left just as you go to pass them. Perhaps this law should limit the highway use to cyclists over the age of 12 or have parental supervision. While I still wouldnt be for such a law I would be more in favor of it. Most cyclists that ride in traffic are adults. We know the rules of the road and how to stay visible. Accidents don't usually happen. Occasionally the gas pedals on certain cars get stuck or a tire blows out or the person driving suffers a heart attack or other ailment incapacipating their driving abilities.. This accounts for about 2 percent of accidents. The other 98 percent could be prevented by a driver keeping their eyes on the road rather then texting. A driver buying a few bottles of beer before leaving a bar and putting those bottles in their trunk and opening them at home rather then drinking them all at the bar then driving home buzzed. 

If a person is using proper lane position on a bike, a car should see them in advance and realize they need to switch lanes and past the cyclist. Problem is many cars will just speed up and honk their horns hoping the simple fact that they have laid on their horn the obstruction in "their lane" will magically vanish and they won't have to switch lanes to pass. When the obstruction doesn't magically vanish. Then they have to suddenly decelarate or slam on their brakes. What is really funny if a big rig truck is in front of their car they slow down rather than relying on their magic horn. But if a cyclists is in front of them they tend to rely on their magic horn. 

OFlent1970
OFlent1970

@Kelly Kaufmann Fine Kelly. This sounds fair! Thanks for the input...

 While we're at it. I saw some speeding cars in my neighbourhood where my kids walk. I saw them run stop signs and break other traffic rules. I propose no more cars on residential streets where there are bike lanes or sidewalks. 

Cars will only drive on the highways that were built for cars.  I mean we should have to go out of our way to accommodate you, why not get out of our way too??

Thanks for the viewpoint. I'll complain to my government rep right now so we can get this implemented!

claybowler
claybowler

@Kelly Kaufmann As a former USCF licensed racer who lived in Chicagoland and observed Lake Forest, Illinois', attempt to get bicycles off of Sheridan and Green Bay roads (prime roads to ride in Chicago),  you are placing more people in danger by forcing fast riders to the bike trails. Riders like this have no business on bike trails, where kids often swerve around corners into the path of these riders. You don't know how many children I had close calls with because I was forced to a bike path. 

OFlent1970
OFlent1970

@Steve Mincerit's backwards until one of these idiots (in a car) comes into your lane and you get hit, and then they complain about it and get some stupid bill passed that bans us from the streets we pay taxes to get built!

BIKESBIKESBIKES
BIKESBIKESBIKES

@Steve Mincer Also, for the record-

As the law currently stands (and will continue to stand, just not on state highways where a designated bike route is within 2 miles or the bike is commuting to somewhere on the state highway), "your" lane is also their lane in many cases.  If you encounter a bike, politely yield and pass when an opportunity arises.  Super simple stuff.  If you cannot do this without yelling, honking, or throwing something, you can give your license back to the DMV.  Bikes aren't trying to piss you off, they're just trying to safely get to where they are going on the road provided to them.  Everyone would love a little extra space on the road, bikers included.  Please respect that.

If you need a refresher course on how to share the road, here's a PDF summarizing Missouri law for driving on the same road as bicyclers: http://mobikefed.org/files/drivers-guide-to-bicycling2005.pdf

BIKESBIKESBIKES
BIKESBIKESBIKES

@Steve Mincer I am an avid cyclist who has been hit a couple of times in this city, once by a girl running a stop sign while texting, and once by a group of teens who purposely swerved to the side of the road and swung their door open to clip me.  I have also unfortunately been behind the wheel and hit a cyclist who didn't stop or look at a stop sign.  None of these incidents resulted in a lawsuit, nor did the thought even come to mind. The fact that a lawsuit is your primary concern and not cyclists' safety is concerning.  Accidents happen and idiots exist, but targetting and banning a necessary mode of transportation is not the proper solution.

mcaruso03
mcaruso03

@BIKESBIKESBIKES totally love that it's so clear and understandable. I wish our state would follow your states lead on your drivers guide- to bicycling.

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