Meth: Anti-Smurfing Campaign Comes to St. Louis To Discourage Illegal Medicine Sales

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St. Louis police want to make it a little bit harder for cooks to make meth -- by scaring those who illegally secure ingredients for the drug.

The state attorney general's office partnered with the metro police department in announcement yesterday that a so-called "Anti-Smurfing Campaign" is coming to the city of St. Louis. It's not about the little blue creatures, but rather curbing the practice of purchasing cold and allergy medicines that contain pseudoephedrine and then selling them to meth cooks, also known as "smurfing."

Officials launched the statewide effort last month, and now St. Louis residents can expect to see signs in pharmacies with warnings like "Meth Makes Children Orphans." More examples below.

See also:
- Photos: Top Twelve Craziest Meth Busts In Missouri, Meth Capital
- Missouri Tops the Nation in Meth Labs (Again), Jefferson County In the Lead
- Illinois Family Accused of Running Meth Lab Is Actually Just Making Maple Syrup

The campaign is a public-private partnership between law enforcement and the Missouri Pharmacy Association, the Missouri Retailers Association and the Consumer Healthcare Products Association -- and it's carried out by retailers on a voluntary basis.

The attorney general's office says that the CHPA tested the anti-smurfing posters to ensure that they effectively discourage people from illegally purchasing medicines for meth cooks.

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"Those of us involved with law enforcement in St. Louis have seen the effects of meth use first hand. We are familiar with the terrible consequences associated with smurfing," St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson says in a statement. "The public needs to be aware of the seriousness of this activity."

Attorney General Chris Koster was in the city yesterday to unveil the St. Louis extension of his campaign.

"In expanding the anti-smurfing campaign to the St. Louis area, leaders with diverse political viewpoints are putting aside their differences and taking meaningful action against smurfing," he says in a statement.

Experts say that the accessibility of these kinds of ingredients is a big part of the meth problem in Missouri, which has remained the Meth Capital of the United States for years now.

Here are some examples of some of the signs you might see around St. Louis followed by the full announcement from the attorney general's office.

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Continue for more materials from the campaign and the full announcement.


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