Illinois Concealed Carry: State Ends Ban, Passes Law Rejecting Governor's Gun Control Ideas

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Across the river from St. Louis, licensed citizens will soon be allowed to carry guns -- after lawmakers in Illinois yesterday officially tossed out the last ban in the nation on concealed carry.

Notably, the legislature passed Illinois' new concealed-carry law without Governor Pat Quinn's suggested gun control provisions.

And Quinn is continuing to argue that allowing guns in public in the manner prescribed by this new law will directly jeopardize public safety.

"Following a weekend of horrific violence in Chicago in which at least 70 people were shot and 12 killed, this was the wrong move for public safety in Illinois," the Democratic governor says in a statement.

See also:
- Illinois Gov. Wants Stricter Gun Law, Aligns With East St. Louis Mayor
- Concealed-Carry Now Legal In Illinois? Madison County's Tom Gibbons Says Yes
- East St. Louis Mayor On Concealed Carry Law: "More Guns...Is Not The Answer

The Illinois General Assembly yesterday easily overrode Quinn's so-called amendatory veto, a revision of the approved concealed-carry law that included stricter policies, such as bans on guns in establishments where liquor is consumed, limitations on the number of clips and ammunition rounds, provisions to allow employers to prohibit guns -- and more.

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Gov. Pat Quinn.

Illinois' ban on concealed carry was last year ruled unconstitutional, which means that the state had a deadline this summer to allow guns in public. Quinn has said he does not agree with that court decision and some local elected officials -- including East St. Louis Mayor Alvin Parks -- have expressed concerns about how concealed-carry may exacerbate crime.

"Throughout the legislative session, I made clear that any concealed carry law must have common-sense standards. I pushed for a ban on assault weapons, limits on high-capacity ammunition magazines and local option for home-rule communities, among other reasonable restrictions," Quinn says in his statement. "Yet, despite my objections, members of the General Assembly surrendered to the National Rifle Association in the waning days of session and passed a flawed bill that allows people to carry guns in establishments that serve alcohol, and allows people to carry unlimited guns and unlimited high-capacity ammunition magazines."

Members of his own party have slammed Quinn for trying to push these changes, arguing that it was grandstanding and political maneuvering. And given the court mandate, if the legislature failed to pass a policy, Illinois would be forced to enact unregulated concealed carry, anyway.

How will it work?

Illinois State Police have published an FAQ, which explains that out-of-state concealed carry permit holders are not granted reciprocity in Illinois, meaning folks in Missouri must also obtain an Illinois license to carry there.

Illinois residents are required as well to have a valid Firearm Owner Identification (FOID) card before obtaining a concealed carry license.

Applications will be available within 180 days -- the time frame allotted to police to establish this kind of system. Licenses will typically be issued 90 days after submission, state police say.

Here is Quinn's full statement, followed by a copy of the bill approved by the legislature.

Today's action by members of the General Assembly was extremely disappointing.

Following a weekend of horrific violence in Chicago in which at least 70 people were shot and 12 killed, this was the wrong move for public safety in Illinois.

Members of the Illinois House could not even manage to pass follow-up legislation that included a few of the critical changes that I outlined last week, such as improved mental health reporting and the duty to immediately inform law enforcement officers of the possession of a loaded concealed weapon.

Throughout the legislative session, I made clear that any concealed carry law must have common-sense standards. I pushed for a ban on assault weapons, limits on high-capacity ammunition magazines and local option for home-rule communities, among other reasonable restrictions. I met with legislators regularly and discussed these standards in my State of the State address and all across the state of Illinois.

Yet, despite my objections, members of the General Assembly surrendered to the National Rifle Association in the waning days of session and passed a flawed bill that allows people to carry guns in establishments that serve alcohol, and allows people to carry unlimited guns and unlimited high-capacity ammunition magazines.

In a supreme overreach, this bill even included the National Rifle Association's trademark provision - a ban on future assault weapon bans in home-rule communities - which has nothing to do with the concealed carry of handguns.

Public safety should never be compromised or negotiated away.

It was wrong on May 31 and it's wrong today.

We will keep fighting for these critical provisions that will save lives and establish a better, more responsible concealed carry law in Illinois.

HB183

Send feedback and tips to the author. Follow Sam Levin on Twitter at @SamTLevin.


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54 comments
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

Oh, I almost missed this: "The fact is, your desire to "feel" safe does not trump anyone's rights." Isn't that what your gun stance is about, too? Watch this and tell me if the Founding Fathers' idea of a well-regulated militia (not your endless desire to own as many and as many types of guns under the sun) could possibly have foreseen what's been happening in this country today: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRMv9R4XN-k

wallyortizjr71
wallyortizjr71

Well I think having these gone laws is a double edged sword. I think by having a concealed weapon is good As far as as protecting your family and yourself. But,

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

Brian, but a security guard preventing more deaths doesn't ease the pain of the families who lost loved ones. THAT's my point on that. One loss of life from someone killing another innocent person is too many. Yes, it's my responsibility to keep myself and my family safe - that's why we don't keep guns in our home, nor do we fraternize with anyone who does. I've known 2 people just in MY life who were killed by guns in the home accidentally - enough for me to forego what you think is protection from either criminals or a tyrannical government. "People defend themselves with a firearm at least as often crimes are committed with them." Now you're being completely illogical. Unless the people defending themselves are whipping out their guns even before someone does something to them. This makes no sense. If you're talking about people chasing away an intruder with no weapon, then there's no proof a weapon was going to be used against them, too. And where's your documentation of your above claims? When I Google this info, I get the Cato Institute's map of self defense, which, although showing many cases of self-defense, doesn't nearly reach the numbers of gun deaths not thwarted in the US. Hundreds vs. tens of thousands. I'd like to see your link. Anyone can invent numbers (which clearly seem exaggerated), and this statement doesn't say anything about whether these are cops or just civilians doing the defending. Here's my link: http://www.cato.org/guns-and-self-defense?gclid=CJLfxuaWqLgCFQ6a4Aod8h0AHA Don't you know how other countries view the US? As gun-loving, and violent. They make fun of us. And I can see why. There's no peace in a place where people think to be safe we need guns all over the place. That's paranoia. Look at Canada's stats (since you didn't like Japan): http://www.gunpolicy.org/firearms/region/canada

Brian Wittling
Brian Wittling

Perhaps you should do some research before further disrespecting the actions of the Columbine guards that day. http://www.examiner.com/article/fact-check-columbine-high-s-armed-guard-saved-student-lives The fact is, your desire to "feel" safe does not trump anyone's rights. You are responsible for your own safety. What exactly are your supposed rights that you say I am superseding? You have no right to "feel safe", so?? You started this off by asking "And before anyone says anything about "a good guy with a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun," I'd like to see the statistics on how well that's gone in any state with conceal carry laws." Well, there is ample evidence of that, not only provided here but in simple Google searches.. and even in the study I linked above “Defensive uses of guns by crime victims is a common occurrence, although the exact number remains disputed. Almost all national survey estimates indicate that defensive gun uses by victims are at least as common as offensive uses by criminals, with estimates of annual uses ranging from about 500,000 to more than 3 million per year, in the context of about 300,000 violent crimes involving firearms in 2008.” So, there you go. People defend themselves with a firearm at least as often crimes are committed with them.

ArmedLiberalInMO
ArmedLiberalInMO

So, how long before the 'rivers of blood' still don't manifest themselves after the 'wild west' of CCW is active (well, more legal than today) in IL?

Anyone have the numbers for carjackings that happen in the St Louis area off of college campuses in MO?  Is that number still in single-digits as it has been since 2008?  Maybe we will finally see those numbers drop in the Metro East.

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

Brian, there were 12 students and a teacher killed at Columbine, and you act like "oh, the guard saved lives." That is NOT a fact. In fact, it is a lie. How many people have to die before you consider something a problem? Just because people drown in pools or fall off roofs, you think tens of thousands of people dying each year from guns is just one more statistic to describe how people perish? Like it can't be helped? How about this? I don't own a gun, and yet there is a fear I could die from being killed by one. But I also don't have a pool, and I DON'T fear drowning in one. Because I have a choice about my own safety when it comes to other ways of dying. Not only that, I have a family, and I have to worry about them, too. Your rights should not supercede MY rights. Period. And the crime rates are lower more due to abortion being legal than any gun laws. Studies show that.

Brian Wittling
Brian Wittling

Wow, a system like motor vehicle control would be great... 50 state reciprocity, no training, no background checks.. Yeah, lets do that. Derp. And not safer? You apparently didn't read the conclusions.

Brian Wittling
Brian Wittling

How do you think those other countries deal with it then? Outright bans. if you think that the guards at Columbine didn't save lives, you have a serious misunderstanding of the facts. If you think Nancy Lanza is an innocent, you misunderstand the laws we already have on the books. The US is not an anomaly in having mentally ill, but we sure are an anomaly among first world nations when it comes to the health care system to treat them. and the only shock factor you should hold is just how *few* of the guns in this country are used illegally. Or that the violent crime rate is actually at historic lows, but now people are losing their minds over the statistical anomalies of mass shooting incidents.

Barry Bean
Barry Bean

Jay, if you're going to call me out by name, take the time to read what I wrote, and have the common decency not to cherry pick stats to suit your bias. 49 states allow concealed carry. None of them have been "jeapordized." Re read my post and study the stats as a whole.

Jay Brandt
Jay Brandt

Actually it has...Barry, you've got to stop posting opinion as fact: "When New York, a city with a strict concealed carry law, is nine times safer than Flint, a city where just about anyone can pack heat, it’s ludicrous to say those laws are a factor in crime rates. Gun owners may feel better with a pistol snuggling against their breasts, but they’re not safer." Source: http://www.nbcchicago.com/blogs/ward-room/Opinion-Concealed-Carry-Law-Wont-Make-Chicago-Safer-185238982.html#ixzz2Ygc3qwam

Jay Brandt
Jay Brandt

How about some actual facts? "Let’s look at New York City. Mayor Michael Bloomberg, one of the nation’s leading gun control advocates, likes to call New York “the safest big city in America.” This year, 414 people have been murdered in New York. That’s the lowest total recorded since police began keeping records in 1963. New York’s murder rate is a third of Chicago’s. Yet it is nearly impossible to obtain a permit to carry a concealed weapon in New York City." On the other hand: "The most lethal place in America is Flint, Mich., a city of 100,000 which averages 60 murders a year. That’s triple Chicago’s murder rate. If Chicago were as violent as Flint, we’d have 1,500 killings a year. In 2001, Michigan liberalized its gun laws to allow any adult without a felony conviction to carry a concealed weapon. Since then, Flint has set annual records for murders." Source: http://www.nbcchicago.com/blogs/ward-room/Opinion-Concealed-Carry-Law-Wont-Make-Chicago-Safer-185238982.html#ixzz2Ygbgeed2

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

Brian, no one is talking about banning or restricting the types of guns you are speaking about. So, what do you propose will stop or reduce the crazy number of gun deaths in the US if we don't look to other countries that do better than us? Add more guns? Why is it improper to compare us with other places that do it better than us? Also, let's not forget that Adam Lanza's mother was the gun owner, and all her weaponry didn't save her life or stop her son. There was armed security at Columbine - and that didn't stop Klebold and Harris. Every college campus has security - unable to stop any of the massacres that have occurred. I don't understand - don't these astounding numbers of people being killed each year by guns hold any kind of shock factor for you? Or are you oversimplifying things by assuming these people would die some other accidental, murderous death some other way? And by the way, what country doesn't have mentally ill people? The US isn't an anomaly regarding that.

Jay Brandt
Jay Brandt

Nice theory, only problem is actual statistics don't validate it.

Jay Brandt
Jay Brandt

The source you offer certainly isn't a rousing endorsement of gun ownership...it suggests a motor vehicle type system of control, suggests that accidental death/injury and suicide may well offset any protective value of gun ownership and basically reinforces what I said about the lack of any current research due to NRA lobbying efforts to shut down any and all studies of gun related injuries and death. Thank you for the link.

Brian Wittling
Brian Wittling

outlines currently known quantities and prioritizes further research. Hopefully we se more like this, particularly where they seek to establish causality relationships.

Tom Barclay
Tom Barclay

The rate of negligent discharge injuries and deaths will increase greatly. Ask any cop or DI: recurrent training is necessary for safe weapons carrying. Average people will not invest in themselves on a continuing basis. And that's how accidents happen.

Jay Brandt
Jay Brandt

Good idea...and then we can have dozens more Zimmerman trials.

Brian Wittling
Brian Wittling

What I think it that Japan is not the United States, and it is improper to compare our country to one that *never had a gun problem to begin with*. the fact that you believe " guns are designed with one thing in mind - harm" only points to your own pre-conceived conclusions. I guess you've never seen a skeet or trap shooting gun, or a bull-barreled pistol? These are expressly designed for target practice. Yeah, sure you you use them to harm someone, but this is not their intended purpose, much like the hands, bats and hammers that are used to kill people more frequently than rifles are. When you ask am I opposed to background checks - what type of checks do you mean? we already have background checks. am I opposed to those? no. Expanding them? Maybe. Since you like links: http://www.independent.org/newsroom/article.asp?id=3568 "In 2004, the National Academy of Sciences reviewed 253 journal articles, 99 books, 43 government publications and some empirical research of its own about guns. The Academy could not identify any gun restriction that had reduced violent crime, suicide or gun accidents."

AJ Wilkes
AJ Wilkes

@Natalie West Side story reenactment with pool fight? Hilarious mental image. It really isn't an argument worth having. CCW permits do nothing to address crime since the likelihood is so low they would be used to avert a low probability act. And the best defense from being harmed by a self inflicted gunshot, accidental or otherwise, is to not own a gun. Everybody wins.

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

Since people are going to have accidents no matter what, then why not limit the cause of one of those ways? And you truly are a compassionate person, I can tell, by referring to accidents as the result of stupidity. And frankly, I'm tired of all the ways people try to make comparisons to otherwise benign things like pools - guns are designed with one thing in mind - harm. Can't say the same thing about pools. Not like someone whips out a pool in the middle of a heated argument and violently kills someone with it. Also, I agree about the mental health crisis. Having said that, why not make sure those who are unstable have a harder time - or be unable to - get a gun? Are you opposed to background checks?

AJ Wilkes
AJ Wilkes

Causation vs correlation regarding guns. The largest drops in crime rates happened well before any of this concealed weapon legislation happened in Missouri. Crime has been flat since 2007. The 1990s rate drop has also been attributed to Roe v Wade.

Brian Wittling
Brian Wittling

yep, mainly suicides. which all only reinforces that we have more of a MENTAL HEALTH issue than a gun issue... as far as accidental deaths go, people accidentally kill themselves all kinds of ways.. you can't outlaw stupidity. back yard swimming pools still kill more children than guns, so should we ban those too?

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

According to the report, suicides make up about 60% of gun related deaths. AND, the report states that one thing all the data show about gun violence is that most appears to be reactive and unplanned - both suicides and crime. This means that without a gun, perhaps the results would not have been a death.

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

Hmmm . . . I replied to your response, Brian, but it seems to have disappeared. Again, "Accidental deaths resulting from firearms accounted for less than one percent of all unintentional fatalities in 2010." Those include everything from car accidents to falling off a roof, to drowning, etc. If you click on the link provided in the article you posted and click to page 31 of the report, read it. It states that even though progress has been made, there were more than 600 accidental deaths by firearms in 2010. And 10% of those were kids under age 15. Unless you think this number is ok, we have a huge problem. Given that a place like Japan, which LOVES their violent video games but has strict gun laws sees about 20-30 gun deaths per year (of all sorts - suicide, accidents, and murder. And that's a bad year for them), it seems to me that we're barking up the wrong tree. As for you, Scott, those weren't informed answers, so no, I didn't like those answers. Read something without an agenda - that means read the actual reports if you really want to know the truth.

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

Unfortunately, people can no longer assume the writer of such a page that you posted did his/her homework. They may have an agenda, and they can easily distort the material.

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

"Accidental deaths resulting from firearms accounted for less than one percent of all unintentional fatalities in 2010." Accidental deaths encompass car accidents, falling off a roof, drowning, etc. - everything imaginable. If you click on the link to the ACTUAL report and click to page 31, look under the heading "unintentional deaths." Read it. It won't let me copy and paste. It states that still, despite the progress, there were more than 600 people who died from accidental death by firearm in the US in 2010. Given that in statistics show that Japan has maybe 20-30 deaths by guns (a bad year) - all types of deaths (suicide, accident, murder) TOTAL in most years, I think it shows that we still have a huge problem. Unless you think 600 people dying accidentally by guns is ok. And about 10% of those deaths were kids under age 15. NOT OK.

Scott Bringhurst
Scott Bringhurst

Don't confront Jay with anything that may counter his pre-conceived notions and pie-in-the-sky dreams.

Brian Wittling
Brian Wittling

Here you go - "“Defensive uses of guns by crime victims is a common occurrence, although the exact number remains disputed. Almost all national survey estimates indicate that defensive gun uses by victims are at least as common as offensive uses by criminals, with estimates of annual uses ranging from about 500,000 to more than 3 million per year, in the context of about 300,000 violent crimes involving firearms in 2008.” It was also discovered that when guns are used in self-defense the victims consistently have lower injury rates than those who are unarmed, even compared with those who used other forms of self-defense." http://www.guns.com/2013/06/27/cdc-releases-study-on-gun-violence-with-shocking-results/

AJ Wilkes
AJ Wilkes

The way to reduce gun crime is to target gun crimes or crimes committed while possessing a gun with harsh penalties. CCW is just your Dad's "Alligator Stick."

Natalie Phillips Siemaszko
Natalie Phillips Siemaszko

People don't seem to understand that the numbers of people out there being killed by guns is NOT just street crime-related. Accidental deaths, domestic violence and suicide make up a huge chunk of the gun deaths in the US. And before anyone says anything about "a good guy with a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun," I'd like to see the statistics on how well that's gone in any state with conceal carry laws.

Kevin Malone
Kevin Malone

The Governor jeopardized public safety by being the last State to pass the law.

Jay Brandt
Jay Brandt

Here's why the NRA has tried to block all studies about gun ownership: The study "found that those with firearms were about 4.5 times more likely to be shot than those who did not carry, utterly belying this oft repeated mantra." Furthermore...the "study also found that for individuals who had time to resist and counter in a gun assault, the odds of actually being shot actually increased to 5.45 fold relative to an individual not carrying...Nor did guns make the women safer; women who purchased guns were 50% more likely to be killed by an intimate partner". So, only if you believe in unicorns could you also believe that more guns will make our cities safer.

Richard Peitz
Richard Peitz

NRA folks know better than to leave guns in a car with an NRA sticker. Wait an see, I'll be willing to bet the crime rates fall. Like every other state.

Mswazi Msanii
Mswazi Msanii

Missourans crossing on the East side watch who you mess with..More guns less police.

Barry Bean
Barry Bean

Hasn't jeopardized public safety in the other 49 states!

David B Fowler
David B Fowler

Criminals don't obey laws. Now playing field is leveling.

Ken Johnson
Ken Johnson

It will help get criminals down a lot faster for the police to bag and tag them. Criminals already carry weapons why would it cause more violence?

Corwin Gibson
Corwin Gibson

There are guns all over east stlouis as it is. And before this law......imagine that. At least now common people can protect themselves legally.

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