ACLU: Police Used "Five Second Rule" to Arrest Ferguson Protesters at Random

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Danny Wicentowski
Officers arresting protesters the night of August 18. Nineteen people were charged with failing to disperse that day.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri argued to a federal judge Monday that St. Louis County and Missouri State Highway Patrol are enforcing an unconstitutional "five second rule" that allows cops to arrest protesters at will.

Known as either the "five second rule" or "keep moving rule," the controversial police tactic was sprung on protesters August 18, nine days after Ferguson cop Darren Wilson shot and killed eighteen-year-old Michael Brown. Police threatened protesters with arrest if they stopped moving, forcing crowds into grueling marches to avoid violating the ill-defined rule.

According to the witnesses brought by the ACLU, police used the tactic arbitrarily, harassing some protesters and letting others go. St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar admitted yesterday the rule even confused officers, who misinterpreted his orders and used the "five second rule" to arrest protesters during the peaceful daytime hours.

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Muslim Prisoner Sues Springfield Jail for Denying Him Access to Quran

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Cezary Piwowarski/Wikimedia
A Muslim prisoner is suing the jail he's locked up in because he claims it won't give him access to a Quran and a prayer rug.

Richard Ray McLendon Jr., who is locked up in the Greene County jail awaiting transfer to a federal prison in Illinois to serve a two-year stint for violating supervised release on a sex offender charge, filed a lawsuit against alleging he is not permitted to bring a Quran into the jail.

"I was told to get someone from the outside to send it from the publisher," McLendon wrote in the lawsuit, according to the Springfield News-Leader. "So I did, and I'm still being denied. There are Bibles everywhere."

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Greene County Politician Charged With Jury Tampering Called For Jury Duty

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Luke Lamb, a "constitutional Sheriff's candidate" in Greene County, Illinois, used this banner during his campaign for the Greene County Board in 2012.
It's too easy to toss out cliches like "Kafkaesque" when describing a particularly bizarre court case, but trust us on this one: Luke Lamb's impending trial for jury tampering really takes the Kafka cake.

Lamb, a small-time politician running for sheriff in Greene County, Illinois, is awaiting trial on a felony charge for unlawful communication with a juror. The charge stems from a series of public Facebook posts he wrote in January to a friend who'd been selected as a juror in a traffic-stop case.

As we reported earlier this summer, Lamb's posts seemingly encouraged the juror to "nullify" any charges. But the posts caught the attention of Lamb's chief political opponent, current Greene County Sheriff Robert McMillan, who filed the felony charge against Lamb.

This week, the situation got even weirder: On Sunday, Lamb opened his mailbox to find a jury summons for October 20, the same day as his own trial for jury tampering.

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A Missouri Politician Is Suing to Stop His Daughters From Getting Birth Control

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via
Representative Paul Weiland doesn't want his daughters taking these, so he's suing.
Missouri Representative Paul Weiland doesn't want his daughters taking birth control, and he's taking the Obama administration to court to stop the Affordable Care Act from giving it to them for free.

Weiland has three daughters -- two adults ages nineteen and eighteen, and a thirteen-year-old -- who are covered under the family health insurance plan. Weiland and his wife, Teresa, object to birth control for religious reasons, but thanks to Obamacare, their daughters can access birth control at no additional cost.

Now the Weilands are suing, telling the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to stop Obamacare from interfering with their parenting -- especially after the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in favor of Hobby Lobby.


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Riverfront Times Seeks Juvenile Records for Officer Darren Wilson

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A 2002 yearbook photo of juvenile Darren Wilson.
In response to a number of inquiries today, the Riverfront Times confirms that it is seeking the juvenile records of Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, the man who shot and killed Michael Brown.

After the Post-Dispatch announced Friday that it is seeking the juvenile records for Brown, many people on Twitter asked that the same scrutiny be placed upon Wilson, who is currently under investigation for the shooting death of the unarmed 18-year-old man.

This is just one avenue of many in our continuing commitment to cover a significant news story for our community.

We have taken this action as a professional news organization, independently and not in conjunction with any other organization, as we seek to report facts and not rely on innuendo or speculation.

Continue on for the Post-Dispatch's announcement that it's seeking the Brown's juvenile records.

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Ferguson Cop Who Arrested Journalists Named in $40 Million Police Brutality Lawsuit

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Twitter/RyanReilly
Ferguson police officer Justin Cosma arrested two journalists on August 13.
Forty million dollars.

That's the sum of the charges listed in a 28-page federal lawsuit filed yesterday against St. Louis County and Ferguson law-enforcement officials. The accusations themselves detail a pattern of civil-rights abuses against protesters in the days following the death of Michael Brown. Six plaintiffs allege they were beaten, tear gassed, shot with rubber bullets and falsely arrested, among other offenses.

Notably, the lawsuit -- which was filed by Malik Shabazz's Washington, D.C.-based Black Lawyers for Justice -- appears to target multiple "John Doe" police officers. They are unnamed because the cops didn't wear name tags and refused to identify themselves when questioned.

The lawsuit lists only one officer by name: Justin Cosma, the same Ferguson cop linked to the arrests of two national journalists who were sitting in a Ferguson McDonald's on August 13. According to the lawsuit, Cosma arrested a mom and her seventeen-year-old son in that very same McDonald's, on the same day, and apparently during the same incident that led to the reporters' arrests.

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Woman Arrested for Trespassing After Protesting Controversial "Right to Farm" Bill

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Missouri's Food for America/Facebook
Police in Springfield arrested a Right to Farm protester at the Ozark Empire Fair after fair security claimed she was causing a disturbance. But opponents of the controversial farm bill say the arrest was an egregious violation of one's freedom of speech.

Last week, Laura Umpenour was at the fair and handing out literature that explained her position against Amendment 1 at a booth operated by Len Pense, a local farmer who also opposes the ballot measure known as "Right to Farm," reports the Springfield News-Leader. Pense also put up prominent signs telling voters to vote no on the amendment.

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No Answer on Lyft in St. Louis Until August 2015. Yes, 2015.

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Lyft
Lyft says its working with city leaders to bring its services to St. Louis.
What was supposed to be a quick trial over a restraining order has grown into a larger case after the ride-share app Lyft and the Metropolitan Taxicab Commission agreed to delay their court case until August 2015.

Judge Joan Moriarty already issued a preliminary injunction against Lyft earlier this week barring the company from operating in St. Louis.


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10 Important Sentences from the Judge's Ruling Against Lyft in St. Louis

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Lyft
Lyft can't operate or advertise rides in St. Louis, a judge ruled.
The ride-sharing app Lyft must stop giving and advertising rides in St. Louis, for the summer and possibly forever, a St. Louis circuit court judge ruled Monday.

The news doesn't change much: Lyft was already under a temporary restraining order preventing it from operating in St. Louis when Judge Joan Moriarty granted the preliminary injunction Monday. Lyft has another chance to plead its case in a permanent injunction hearing set for the end of August, so the story isn't over.

The latest ruling is a win for the Metropolitan Taxicab Commission, which has demanded that Lyft, Uber, Carmel and other rideshare app businesses comply with taxi codes and license drivers and cars. Carmel is fully licensed, and Uber is working with the city on licensing.

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UPDATE: St. Louis Archdiocese and Defrocked Priest Head to Trial Today on Sex Abuse Cover-Up

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Joseph Ross
Update 9:11 a.m.: The case settled this morning prior to the start of trial. Ken Chackes, the attorney for Jane Doe, is to make a statement later today. More as it develops.

Update 9:42 a.m.: In a prepared statement, attorney Ken Chackes confirmed that the case was settled. And, in terms of the settlement, could (and would) only state the following:

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