Ludwig Farmstead Creamery's Unpasteurized Cheese: Safe, But Salty

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Raw milk cheese won't make you sick...unless you're a pregnant woman or small child. Then it might.
​While doing our Sunday grocery shopping at Straub's (8282 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton; 314-725-2121), something caught Gut Check's eye in the cheese island: a new unpasteurized offering from Ludwig Farmstead Creamery.

The farm, located about three hours from St. Louis in Fithian, Illinois, breeds Holstein cows, which produce the raw milk cheesemaker Fons Smits uses to make his aged goods. Four varieties are currently available at the four Straub's locations: Feather Ridge, a sharp cheese aged four months; Jake's Wheel, a Havarti-inspired variety; Kickapoo, which tastes faintly of pineapple; and a traditional Dutch Farmstead Gouda. All four the Wine & Cheese Place locations also carry the cheese.

A $3 hunk of Ludwig's Gouda in hand, Gut Check was ready to mosey to the checkout lanes when a thought occured to us: Won't we get sick if we eat cheese that isn't pastuerized?


Gut Check wanted this new cheese so much we almost just chanced a little E. coli, but our health comes first. So we contacted Norma Glodas, the cheese specialist at Straub's in Clayton.

Glodas brought good news: There's no danger in eating cheese made with raw milk because the industry places regulations on the product. The aging process should take care of any deadly germs lurking in your cheese. However, Glodas cautioned us, pregnant women and children shouldn't eat it. Along with rollercoasters and booze, unpasteurized cheese is also on the list of wondrous things they can't enjoy.

Norma's take on the cheese? It's OK. Not her favorite. After sampling the Gouda, we have to agree. It was dry and seemed almost salty to us. Personally, we'd rather risk death sky diving than on mediocre cheese.


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Straub's

8282 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton, MO

Category: General

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9 comments
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Glad I didn't listen...
Glad I didn't listen...

I happened to be at Straub's place the other day (love Norma!) and tried Jake's wheel.  OMG, they put bacon it in!  What genius...SO good.  I'm glad that I didn't read this before I stumbled into the cheese shop - it may have swayed me to not check out the Ludwig cheeses and I would have missed out on cheesey bacon goodness.  I'm disappointed with Gut Check...they totally missed the mark on this one.  Maybe it's a new writer, but not impressed by this article.

Creamery
Creamery

I am sorry to hear that the writer did not like the cheese, however the comparison pulled is out off line. The great thing about food is that it goes with the preference of the individual and therefor what one person likes the other does not. For that same reason the creamery produces several cheeses which are all very different and I am sure if the writer would have tried the other cheeses she might have found a cheese to fit here preference.  Regarding the raw milk cheese and the risk involved eating this, this to most extend depends on the hygiene and sanitation used during milking and making the product. Another great benefit from using raw milk and minimizing the processing, is that products are created with unique flavors, these flavors will be very different then the standard pasteurized products on the market. And sometimes these flavors can be a little strong and some people might not prefer such. Because true raw milk cheeses are made on a smaller farmstead level, these products are very important to maintain the American heritage and are very important to sustain the smaller farms. For that reason and to give the writer a better understanding in  how raw milk cheeses are produced, I would like to invite the writer to visit the creamery and farm, and make a batch of cheese with us

Really, RFT?
Really, RFT?

This is a really poorly written post.  The bulk of the text is the author expounding upon her own ignorance of the subject matter.  I've had the Gouda, it's exceptional.   The author should worry less about risking death sky diving and more about learning what an authentic Dutch Gouda should taste like. 

Nutrition
Nutrition

"Gut Check" must not do any research prior to posting information on their site.  Raw milk produced under sanitary conditions and tested for bacteria, etc, provides more nutrients to all humans, pregnant or not, by not destroying certain enzymes during pasteurization.  It is becoming very popular in many parts of the US, which must provide better educated "research checks" than "gut checks." 

GoCards!
GoCards!

I disagree entirely with the comparison that eating raw cheeses is as dangerous or "deadly" as sky diving.  This article contradicts itself by saying eating raw milk cheeses perfectly safe in one paragraph then saying that it may kill you as the final sentence. Also, if Norma said that the gouda was not her favorite...why did the authors not try one of the other Ludwig cheeses presented that may have been Norma's favorite?  I am confused by this article in more ways than one.  I would rather have had them sample the four varieties and give a more thorough tasting evaluation.  Maybe it's asking too much for thorough reporting, though.

Quant1954
Quant1954

This borders hysteria. Europeans are eating tons of unpasteurized cheese every day. The outbreaks of E. coli we've seen this spring is from other products. You have a 60-day rule for unpasteurized cheese in the US so how dangerous can it be? If you're so afraid of what you're eating there are a lot of other precautions you should take as well, and perhaps you do. 

jillyph
jillyph

"Borders hysteria" how?  The point I got out of the article is that it's safe for most people to eat; the reviewer just personally thought it wasn't all that tasty.  What's hysterical about that? 

Harpoholstein
Harpoholstein

That it makes pregant women and children sicker than others.  She apparantly did not do her homework regarding raw milk produced in sanitary conditions and tested with respect to the important enzymes that are not destroyed when pasteurized. 

Sonicdevo
Sonicdevo

I think the "hysteria" the above poster mentioned was about the fact that someone seemed to have a little freak out over something being raw milk (and then go on to equate it to sky diving). The article is also a little unclear. Raw cheeses aren't like small children and raw honey, if a cheese has a toxic concentration of e-coli or listeria, pregnant or not,  you will get sick. Pregnant women pose an additional health risk of harm to the fetus. That said, the chances of any of that happening are extremely low. In fact, the FDA did a study a few years ago. In this study, they grouped food according to 23 different categories. Aged cheeses, like gouda, be they pasteurized OR raw, scored at almost the very bottom of that list. That was below things like fruits and vegetables (what scored the top? smoked salmon, by an extremely wide margin. So I find it funny that no one freaks out over that). Very soft cheeses do pose a higher risk, but that is regardless of if they are pasteurized or not (though the risk on raw is slightly higher). People tend to forget that a majority of the cheese related outbreaks in this country have been traced back to pasteurized cheeses (and soft Mexican cheeses produced by non-inspected faculities).

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