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The 13 Most Overcooked Food Trends of 2013

Categories: New Year's Eve

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Except the cronut. We love the cronut. (Photo: Tejal Rao)
Here are thirteen food trends that have become ubiquitous and shed the sheen of novelty -- now they're just dull and sometimes annoying, in spite of an exciting debut.

(To keep things interesting, we've included a few food trends we hope continue into 2014 and beyond. See if you can identify which trends or innovations were welcome additions in 2013.)

The Cronut Craze
By his own account, Daniel alum Dominique Ansel opened a bakery because he saw gaps in New York's pastry offerings, and he was eager to expand the sweet horizons of his fellow New Yorkers. After capturing a loyal local following with his freshly baked treats, he began thinking about how to elevate the doughnut; two months of experimentation begot the Cronut, which he unleashed upon the city back in May. Twenty-four hours later, the mania began -- and with it came lines so long you'd think the guy was giving out money. If mimicry is the highest form of flattery, Ansel had fervent admirers: Knockoffs proliferated so quickly he was forced to trademark his invention's name; that fans still flock to his tiny shop daily for one of 450 treats is testament to the staying power of the original. Ansel is a pastry genius, and he's humble about his success -- so we'll happily ride his train until it leads us to the next mania-inducing snack, which will almost certainly come out of his tiny kitchen. As for the knockoffs? We'll be happy to see those die. And we wouldn't mind if the food tourists took interest in some of the baking wizard's other projects, thereby dispensing with the insane wait. -- Laura Shunk

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Mark Manger
"Put an egg on it!"
Putting a Fucking Egg on Everything
This season on Top Chef: New Orleans, editor of Food & Wine magazine Dana Cowin declared that -- along with kale and bacon -- she is completely done with the "eggs over everything" trend. The chefs sighed, heartbroken, while we found ourselves yelling back at the screen "Thank GOD somebody finally said it." We get it, chefs: It looks pretty, the yolk adds a dollop of fat and flavor, and there's a long list of classic dishes that call for a barely cooked egg -- atop pizza and classic steak tartare; dropped in soups, rice bowls, and congees. But it's gotten a little fanatical. Just about anything can be ordered "sunrise" style these days, and eggs are showing up on all three courses of our meal. It's boring us to tears.

With apologies to Dr. Seuss, the extent of our frustration can really only be expressed in rhyme:

"Do you like sunny eggs on ham?"
I do not like them, Sam I am.
I do not like them on my lox.
I think I need an egg detox.
See Sam, this trend, it has to die.
I don't want runny cum on rye.
It's pretty in a picture, true,
But quickly turns a dish to glue.
Just cut it out! This has to stop.
Runny eggs turn food to slop.
I do not like them on a salad,
They are not for every palate.
A salad ought to be refreshing.
Please, God, just give me normal dressing.

Not a la carte or with fixed prix,

We're sick to death of eggs, you see.
'Cause eggs are served not here or there.
Eggs are on everything, everywhere.
-- Jessica Lussenhop


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