The Six Best Sloppy Drummers

Categories: Nitpick Six

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4. Adrienne Davies (Earth)
I don't know much about Adrienne Davies, and the Internet is not much help. I do know that she plays drums in doom-metal turned doom-Western band Earth, and that she is involved with the band's figurehead Dylan Carlson. I also know that she has an amazing ability to hit her snare and ride cymbal on the same beat without exactly hitting them at the same time, meanwhile being a few dozen milliseconds behind on closing her hi-hat. Earth's tunes tend to be in a tempo that is below what most metronomes can handle, and this version of slow is harder than most versions of fast.

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3. Jeremiah Green (Modest Mouse)
A punk dude once complained about Modest Mouse to me because "The drummer sounds like he's playing a different song than the rest of the band." Jeremiah Green is the drummer in question, and his enthusiasm for hitting as many drums and cymbals as possible was unstoppable on the group's earliest releases. Check out his playing on "Penny Fed Car," a cut from the album Sad Sappy Sucker - which was initially shelved, probably due in part to Green's uncontained performances. Dude's a slop monster. His playing peaked on 1997's Lonesome Crowded West, and in the years since he's become less interesting as he becomes more technically solid.


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7 comments
daverdinj
daverdinj

As a drummer I am always working to improve my technique and tightness, while always looking for opportunities to break away from this foundation. While its unwise for a drummer to aim or settle for sloppy drumming, it is important to remember that perfect timing and precision doesn't always make for superior drumming. A lot of it depends on the genre, song and other bandmate's styles. Some of the most intense, exciting music I've heard lacks much in the way of rhythmic precision, but often that is what makes it exciting to listen to and gives it unique personality. While precise drumming is impressive and has it's place, always knowing exactly when and how the next snare, kick or cymbal hit will strike can be boring to listen to after a while, and can suck a lot of feeling out of a song.  Look at your drumming as a screw ...tighten it as much as possible, but when the music allows for it loosen it just enough so that it's still holding things together while allowing things to move.

daverdinj
daverdinj

As a drummer I am always working to improve my technique and tightness, while always looking for opportunities to break away from this foundation. While its unwise for a drummer to aim or settle for sloppy drumming, it is important to remember that perfect timing and precision doesn't always make for superior drumming. A lot of it depends on the genre, song and other bandmate's styles. Some of the most intense, exciting music I've heard lacks much in the way of rhythmic precision, but often that is what makes it exciting to listen to and gives it unique personality. While precise drumming is impressive and has it's place, always knowing exactly when and how the next snare, kick or cymbal hit will strike can be boring to listen to after a while, and can suck a lot of feeling out of a song.  Look at your drumming as a screw ...tighten it as much as possible, but when the music allows for it loosen it just enough so that it's still holding things together while allowing things to move.

kdj368
kdj368

Ok.    Kidding!


How the number of Big Time Bands that either broke up or whose albums thereafter became pretty lame after losing their drummer?  Hint -- lots of em.  Drummers are the backbone of the band.

kdj368
kdj368

What do you call a person that likes to hang out with musicians? 


A drummer.  ;)

JackGrimshaw
JackGrimshaw

Then-heavyweight champ Sonny Liston's priceless comment on seeing the Beatles (at Shea Stadium?): "My dog can play the drums better than that kid with the big nose."

delmarva
delmarva

I've heard Ringo called "fluid" but not sloppy before. But never mind that. Ringo was the last little bit of Tabasco sauce the Beatles needed to make themselves THE BEATLES. I'm not talking music; I'm talking presentation & public persona. The other 3 Beatles took themselves too seriously on stage -- John the moody rebel, Paul the stiff businessman and George the blend-in-with-the-drapes-&-just-play guy (though he's my fave). 

They needed a smiling, lovable clown or stuffed animal to help them all loosen their collars a bit. To help the public love *them*, not just their music. Pete Best in that role? No way. 

Ringo was that guy.

patrick355
patrick355

Ringo was brilliant and the Beatles wouldn't have been the Beatles without him.  "Ringo gets a lot of crap from musicians for being the least proficient Beatle at his instrument."  There's so much wrong with that sentence.  Not everyone who owns a guitar, a drum set or an opinion is a musician, and their opinions are worth less than a bucket of cold sweat.   Ringo's "problem" is precisely that he was too musical a player to stick out of the mix as a 'holy-shit, did-you-see-that?' drummer.  In the Venn diagram of Great Drummers and H.S.D.Y.S.T.? drummers, there's only one man in the intersection: John Bonham.  Everyone else who aspires to the latter obviates membership in the former.  

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