Rap-Metal Is Back...and It's Actually Good

Categories: Hip-Hop, Metal

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Body Count, who performed last night at Mayhem Fest, are a shining example of this unexpected phenomenon.
Metal is an ever-turning and twisting genre, following wormholes into subgenres and melding any and all techniques and sounds along the way in a constant struggle to create something new and original. It doesn't always work, and anyone who lived through the '90s can attest that the addition of hip-hop elements like rapping and turntables were a serious low point.

Except now we have a whole generation who grew up on that music and wants to give it another whirl. You can find bands like Whitechapel and Suicide Silence admitting how much their sound is indebted to Korn and Slipknot, while others are even busting out those turntables again.

There's a difference this time, though. Insane as it may sound to say it, now it's working.

I'll be the first to slam '90s rap-metal. Even those who hand in inventing it, like Mike Patton of Faith No More, came out strongly against it; he famously once said, "Don't blame me for that shit." Yet his part in its creation is undeniable thanks to the massive success that was "Epic."

And "Epic," along with various other experiments in the idea, like Sonic Youth's "Kool Thing" with Chuck D, Anthrax and Public Enemy's "Bring the Noise," and Run DMC's version of "Walk This Way," proved that the idea could work. It just...didn't.

As bands copied the idea, not just collaborating with rappers but making it a vital part of their sound as rappers and DJs became full-fledged members, it became increasingly trite and awful. You may feel nostalgic for Linkin Park, but go listen to Hybrid Theory again. It was shit. Search your feelings; you know it to be true.

But here we are in 2014, and that generation who grew up on that kind of music, who have been influenced by it and are unashamedly fans of it, are now creating. The most bizarre thing is that they're creating well.

Maybe it's because of how far metal has come since then. One of the most aggravating things about the original rap-metal movement was how it tried to combine bad rapping with bad Pantera-esque groove-metal riffage.

These new bands are drawing instead on death metal and technical metal influences to shape their riffs, and apparently have been paying attention to better rappers over the years. After all, rap has come a long way since the '90s, too.

Continue to page two.



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